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Self validating tests

The general intent behind this paper is to furnish the reader with a broad overview of both Schematron and its approach to validation.

For example, we may select all Regular grammars, as used in DTDs, can then be viewed as tree patterns where the only available axis is the parent-child axis [Jelliffe1999e].

Full use of tree pattern validation provides the maximum amount of freedom when modelling constraints for a schema.

A trivial XML vocabulary is introduced for the purposes of generating examples.

The later sections in this paper provides an overview of the open source XSLT framework used to implement the Schematron language.

Other tutorial materials fulfill these roles already [Holman],[XPath],[XSLT] ,[Ogbuji C],[Ogbuji U].

During the last few years a number of different XML schema languages have appeared as suggested replacements for the ageing Document Type Definition (DTD).

This paper provides an introduction to Schematron; an innovative XML validation language developed by Rick Jelliffe.

This innovation stems from selecting an alternative approach to validation than existing schema languages: Schematron uses a tree pattern based paradigm, rather than the regular grammars used in DTDs and XML schemas.

There is no enforcement that an IDREF must point to an ID on a particular element type, simply that is must point to an existing ID, and further that all IDs must be unique.

Having highlighted the fact that the existing schema paradigm can only express constraints among data items in terms of the child and sibling axes, it is natural to consider whether an alternate paradigm might allow a schema author to exploit these additional relationships to define additional types of constraint amongst document elements.

Tree patterns are the schema paradigm underpinning Schematron as a validation language.